Two features that make the OLYMPUS OM-D E-M1 far superior to the Canon EOS R6

Hi everyone!
I’m going to talk about two features that make the OLYMPUS OM-D E-M1 far superior to the Canon EOS R6.

What are the features that make a micro four thirds camera released 8 years ago overwhelmingly superior to the latest full size camera?

The OLYMPUS OM-D E-M1 was released on October 11, 2013.

I purchased my OM-D E-M1 on August 9, 2014.
Since then, I used it for 6 years until I got my Canon EOS R6 on September 11, 2020.
Although the EOS R6 has completely taken over my work, I still use the E-M1 for taking photos for this blog from time to time.

I believe that the OM-D E-M1, which is an “old generation” digital camera, has two features that are overwhelmingly superior to the EOS R6, which is a state-of-the-art digital camera.

The E-M1 is a micro four thirds camera and the R6 is a full size camera, so of course the E-M1 has the advantage of being smaller and lighter, but that’s not what I’m talking about here.
I am talking about features.

Two features that make the OLYMPUS OM-D E-M1 far superior to the Canon EOS R6

Two features that make the OLYMPUS OM-D E-M1 far superior to the Canon EOS R6.
They are these two features.

  • The leveler instantly switches between horizontal and overhead shooting.
  • The height and width instantly switches to match the camera’s height and width when playing back photos.

The level indicator instantly switches between horizontal and overhead shooting

Level on the OLYMPUS OM-D E-M1

First, take a look at this picture.
This is the level of the OM-D E-M1 when it is held horizontally as usual.
It does not matter whether the camera is vertical or horizontal.

OLYMPUS OM-D E-M1 Leveler (horizontal)

And here is the level when the E-M1 is held directly down (overhead shot).

OLYMPUS OM-D E-M1 Level (overhead view)

It may be difficult to see in the photo, but the vertical/horizontal axis of the leveler measures the tilt of the camera when it is held in either a horizontal or overhead position.
It senses the angle of the camera and instantly optimizes the behavior of the leveler.

Canon EOS R6 horizon

Next, take a look at this picture.
This is the level of the EOS R6 when it is held horizontally as usual.

Canon EOS R6 level (horizontal)

And here is the level when the R6 is held directly down (overhead shot).

Canon EOS R6 level (overhead view)

The vertical axis of the R6 level is completely dysfunctional when the camera is held directly down, isn’t it?
The horizontal axis is also weirdly sensitive, and it spins around if you move the camera just a little bit.

I don’t know how much you guys use the camera’s built-in level, but I use it a lot, and every time I have a chance to take an overhead shot, I think, “Too bad about the level on the EOS R6.

The height and width instantly switches to match the camera’s height and width when playing back photos taken

Playback screen of the OLYMPUS OM-D E-M1

Camera horizontal position

Take a look at this picture.
This photo was taken with the OM-D E-M1 and is being played back with the camera in the horizontal position.

OLYMPUS OM-D E-M1 side view Playback in horizontal position

OLYMPUS OM-D E-M1 Vertical Photo horizontal position playback

Camera in vertical position

And here it is with the camera switched to the vertical position as it is.

OLYMPUS OM-D E-M1 side view Vertical Playback

OLYMPUS OM-D E-M1 Vertical Photo Vertical Playback

The camera’s rotation is detected and the playback photo is also rotated.
Thanks to this feature, photos taken in landscape mode can be comfortably played back on a horizontal display, and photos taken in portrait mode on a vertical display.

With the EOS R6, if you just want to view landscape photos on a landscape display and portrait photos on a portrait display, you can turn off the “Portrait Image Rotation Display” option in the settings, but this may cause a little trouble, which I will explain later.
We’ll leave it at that for now.

Canon EOS R6 playback screen (with “Vertical Image Rotation Display” turned on)

This is a playback of a photo taken with the EOS R6 with “Rotate Vertical Image Display” turned on.

Camera horizontal position

Canon EOS R6 Horizontal Photo Horizontal Position Playback With rotation

Canon EOS R6 Vertical Photo Horizontal Playback With rotation

Camera vertical position

And here it is with the camera switched to the vertical position as it is.

Canon EOS R6 Horizontal Photo Vertical Position Playback

Canon EOS R6 Vertical Photo Vertical Playback With rotation

Both horizontal and vertical photos can only be checked with the camera held in the horizontal position.
But for photos taken in portrait position, you want to check them by playing them back in a larger size on a portrait screen.

Canon EOS R6 playback screen (with “Rotate Vertical Image Display” turned off)

So, turn off “Rotate Vertical Image Display”.
Then the playback will look like this.

Camera horizontal position

Horizontal photos are optimized for horizontal display, and vertical photos are optimized for vertical display.

Canon EOS R6 horizontal photo horizontal position playback No rotation

Canon EOS R6 Vertical Photo Horizontal Playback No rotation

Camera vertical position

Canon EOS R6 Horizontal Photo Vertical Position Playback No rotation

Canon EOS R6 Vertical Photo Vertical Playback No rotation

At first glance, there seems to be no problem, as a horizontal photo can be viewed on the horizontal display with the camera in landscape mode, and a vertical photo can be viewed on the vertical display with the camera in portrait mode.
However, there is that “little problem” I mentioned earlier.
What kind of trouble is it?

I can’t notice a photo that has unintentionally changed its height and width

This means that you can’t notice a photo that has been unintentionally altered in height and width.
In other words, I can’t notice when I take a picture that I meant to take horizontally, but it turned out vertically, or when I meant to take a picture vertically, but it turned out horizontally.

If you can notice this when you check the image on your computer, you can fix it then, but if you can notice it when you check the image, you can use the “Rotate Still Image” function to fix it right then and there.

It would be great if, with the “Vertical Image Rotation Display” turned on, I could instantly see whether the photo I just took is in portrait or landscape mode, and if the portrait mode photo fills the display in portrait mode when I turn the camera down vertically, that would be great.

Two Itchy OLYMPUS OM-D E-M1 Features

So, I’ve talked about two features that make the OLYMPUS OM-D E-M1 vastly superior to the Canon EOS R6, guys, what do you think?

It’s just a small thing, but it’s something I’m quite interested in.
I think these small differences in UX may actually be surprisingly important.
I wonder if the latest OM-1 has inherited this feature.
And what about Nikon and Sony cameras?
I’ll give it a try when I get a chance.

Well then, if you guys want to take a look at it, I’ll be glad to help you out!

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